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Field Trips & Group Visits

school bus drawing and kids doing experiments

2022-23 Request Form is coming soon!

Camp Week at the Science Center

Thank you so much for an awesome field trip!! The students and the parents all had a great time. See you next year!!
 Mrs. Beth Sine, Pre-K Teacher, Archbishop Neale School

Field Trips

Field Trip Catalog

Field Trip Photo

Includes:

Fulldome Movie

-and-

Hands-on Discovery Lab Activity

-and-

NOAA Science On A Sphere Program

not included on several trips due to extended lab

(All structured around a common theme)
+ Additional Planetarium Sky Show available
(additional $2 per person)
Students $10
Adults $8
Chaperones One free chaperone per 10 paid students
Minimum group size 12 paid admissions

Group Visit

Dome Show Catalog

Potomac Group

Includes:

Fulldome Show

(times vary)

-and-


Planetarium Show

(20 minutes)
Ideal for any group size and all ages.

-or-

Science On a Sphere Program

(20 minutes)
Ideal only for groups under 40 guests, and ages 8+


Adults & Children $8
Minimum group size 12 paid admissions

Group Visit Plus+

Dome Show Catalog

Group Visit Plus+

Includes:

Fulldome Movie

(times vary)

-and-

Planetarium Show

(20 minutes)

-and-

NOAA Science On a Sphere Program

(20 minutes)

Adults & Children $10
Minimum group size 12 paid admissions

Planetarium Show Information

Our planetarium sky show is designed for all ages. It is tailored to the age level of the audience, and can be customized to highlight specific stellar objects, or historically astronomic events.

Read more

Our planetarium show begins with a look around our local area at the James E. Richmond Science Center. We look to the sky to see the Sun, our closest star, which provides just about all of the energy that we have available on Earth. We watch the Sun travel from East to West across the daytime sky, and discuss the changing length of daylight hours between the seasons.

After sunset we identify the Moon and any planets that are visible during twilight, and briefly discuss how to see them. As night falls we locate the Big Dipper, an asterism in the northern sky, formed by the seven brightest stars in our nighttime sky. We show how use the Big Dipper to always be able to find your way North, by pointing to the North Star, Polaris. From Polaris, we easily locate the Little Dipper constellation.

We re-identify the Big Dipper and Little Dipper as the constellations Ursa Major and Ursa Minor, and transition from astronomy to astrology by showing the mythological images of the Great Bear and Baby Bear, and recount the mythological story of how they got into the sky, and why their tails became so long.

All of the constellations visible from the Northern Hemisphere are then displayed and identified, and their mythological images are presented. Additional mythological stories may be added at this time.

We leave our Earthly view of the heavens and launch to the red planet, Mars, our neighbor in space. On the way we discuss the upcoming human missions to Mars: why we’re going and who will go. Next we visit the most beautiful planet, Saturn, and revel in the beauty of Saturn’s magnificent rings. We return closer to home to see our Moon, and discuss our past and future missions there. We return to orbit the Blue Marble, our home planet. We view Earth from both the daylight and nighttime sides, and slice the planet open to view it’s four main layers: the crust, mantle, outer core and inner core. We identify the core as being made of the three magnetic metals: nickel, iron and cobalt; and discuss the reason that Earth has a North Pole and South Pole. We show the incredible magnetic field surrounding Earth, the Magnetosphere, created by the magnetic core of our planet.

Our planetarium sky show concludes with a magical fireworks exhibition, to celebrate our successful return to Earth.


Community education is the primary role of the Science Center. We would like to extend an invitation for your students or group members to take advantage of this resource by scheduling a field trip or group visit. The James E. Richmond Science Center at St. Charles High School houses the Digital Dome Classroom. With a diameter of 60 feet and seating for up to 184 people, the Digital Dome Classroom is one of the largest of its kind! The Science Center also features a NOAA Science On a Sphere® (SOS), a room-sized globe providing visual instruction about science, the Earth, and the environment. Students will have an opportunity to interact in a hands-on inquiry lab as well as receive direct instruction from qualified educators. We hope that you will take advantage of this awesome opportunity and let your students and groups experience all that the James E. Richmond Science Center has to offer.

On behalf of my 2nd grade teammates we would like to thank you again for a very successful and fun trip. The students and parents really enjoyed themselves! Thank you for being so organized and patient with helping me to plan, as it was our first visit. My teammates and I look forward to the possibility of repeating this trip next year!
Teacher, Evergreen Elementary School, St. Mary’s County Public Schools


Good afternoon, just wanted to send a quick email to personally let you know how much fun my daughter had attending the field trip with her class. She is a 2nd grader at Mt. Hope Elementary, and was here for the program yesterday. She told us all about it at dinner, and then went to her book bag and got out the model earth that she made in clay. She proceeded to tell us all about how they made it, while she re-labeled the different sections with her tooth pick tags. It was obvious that she had fun, had learned a lot, and came home excited about it. We appreciate what you guys do. Have a great day.
Justin P. Conte, Aquatics Manager